Creating
A Better
Tomorrow

Your support today unleashes
the potential of tomorrow

Every day people come to The Ottawa Hospital searching for answers; and every day, our innovative research brings hope to patients and their families. Every life changed, and every life saved through compassionate care and groundbreaking work at our hospital is made possible because of you.

We want you to be at our side; to help us push new discoveries and treatments forward, equip our team with the latest technology and equipment and ensure that our patients receive the very best care.

Creating Tomorrow

Catastrophic injuries require novel approach by our plastic surgery team
Karen Toop was hit by a snowplow while crossing the street in January 2012. She was critically injured when she arrived at our Trauma Centre. A multi-disciplinary team was ready to care for the injuries that some only see once in their career.
Navigating a premature birth during COVID-19
Premature labour at just 25 weeks comes as a ‘complete shock’ for a young family during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Olympic equestrian thankful for ‘unbelievable’ trauma care
After an incredibly rare accident on his farm in Perth, Olympic equestrian Ian Millar was rushed to The Ottawa Hospital Trauma Centre with a severe arm injury with tremendous blood loss. A skilled team was ready to provide the care he needed to get him back doing what he loves most.
Canadian armwrestling legend wins championship after arthroscopic surgery
Devon “No Limits” Larratt is a Canadian armwrestling world champion in both the left and right arms. But even champions face injury and hardships. Devon’s led him to experts at The Ottawa Hospital.
Celebrating a “re-birthday” each year since having a cancerous brain tumour removed
Ten years ago, The Ottawa Hospital saved Kimberly Mountain’s life after the discovery of cancerous brain tumour. Today, she’s confident if the cancer comes back, The Ottawa Hospital will be ready to save her again.
Mid-surgery decision to leave abdomen open for two days saves woman’s life
Phyllis’ life was on the line. A twist in her small intestine was causing it to die. But a surgical technique to leave her abdomen open saved her life.