Life-changing cancer diagnosis and treatment inspires donor

When test results came back showing George Knight had prostate cancer, he was determined to act quickly and beat it. Now he’s equally determined to support the hospital that saved him and to become a volunteer to help future patients.

George was faithful when it came to his annual health checkups and was fortunate enough to have always been relatively healthy. For that reason, he didn’t think too much of it when his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) numbers started to creep up. But his family doctor referred him to The Ottawa Hospital where he met urologist Dr. Brian Blew who ordered a biopsy. The results were shocking – prostate cancer. It was the beginning of a health journey George never anticipated, finding himself at the centre of a cancer battle under the care of an exceptional team of doctors, nurses, and radiotherapists. Now, more than a year later, George is a proud monthly donor to the hospital, determined to give back through philanthropy and volunteering his time to help other patients.

George and Maria on vacation
George and Maria on vacation.

Shocking news

In April 2019, George and his wife Maria, had just returned from an annual trip to Mexico when he received the news that the biopsy results showed he had prostate cancer. George’s PSA levels had always been on the higher side and the recent increase could very well have been a result of aging, so he was shocked to learn that he had intermediate risk prostate cancer. Dr. Blew offered George two options: have the prostate removed surgically or undergo radiation. George wanted to act quickly and felt radiation was his best course of action. “I wanted to get on this right away, so I immediately started radiation. I had 20 treatments in total. I felt very fortunate because I know some men need to have more.” said George.

“We have a rare gem of a facility here in Ottawa and by giving, I know it will help future patients receive the same level of care I received.” – George Knight

Compassionate care

George was grateful for the quick treatment and for how well he was taken care of. “I had excellent care from all of my doctors. Dr. Blew, Dr. Alain Haddad, and Dr. J.M. Bourque, and all of the nurses and radiotherapists. They were all absolutely amazing. I couldn’t have asked for any better.” While he was understandably worried, his care team quickly put him at ease.

George Knight
George Knight

Following his radiation, George is feeling better than ever. He is back to doing his many hobbies and he and Maria are back at the yoga studio where he practices twice a week. “I feel 100% — better than I’ve felt in a long time. I have more energy now and my PSA numbers are back in an acceptable range. I got very lucky. I’m feeling wonderful.”

“George’s donation will allow us to continue to develop the best tools for assessment and treatment.” – Dr. Blew

Accordingly, he thinks the excellent care he received helped him get back to good health quickly, and he wants his story to encourage others to get checked. “We caught it really early so that made a really big difference. Now I nag my male friends that are over 50 years old to go and get checked. They hum and haw but it’s important because sometimes you feel fine, even when you aren’t,” said George.

Dr. Blew is quick to echo the importance of regular screening. “Mr. Knight was very knowledgeable about PSA screening and understood a high PSA is not always due to prostate cancer but requires assessment to determine if treatment is needed instead of monitoring. George’s donation will allow us to continue to develop the best tools for assessment and treatment.”

Turning gratitude into action

The care George received has inspired him to sign up to be a volunteer at the hospital, something he has never done before. “I saw a quote online by Jim Rohn that said, ‘Only by giving are you able to receive more than you already have’ and it really struck a chord with me. This is why I need to give back.” In this same spirit, he has also decided to become a monthly donor. “I trusted the hospital with my health and now I trust it with my support. I want the hospital to have regular support that they can count on. We have a rare gem of a facility here in Ottawa and by giving, I know it will help future patients receive the same level of care I received.”

The Ottawa Hospital is a leading academic health, research and learning hospital proudly affiliated with the University of Ottawa.

Join George in becoming a monthly donor and help patients like him receive the very best care and latest treatment available.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
New approach to treating brain tumours changed young patient’s life
Following a decade of mini-seizures, Stefanie Scrivens was diagnosed with grade 2 oligodendroglioma. She would be one of the first to benefit from a new treatment option that could increase her chance of survival – and it’s working.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.

Healthcare trailblazer dedicated to serving others

Hélène Létourneau-Donnelly has been a trailblazer for The Ottawa Hospital as a healthcare provider, a donor, and volunteer. Now, she wants to leave a lasting legacy for the next generation.

Healthcare trailblazer to breast cancer survivor

When you look at the inspiring life of Hélène Létourneau-Donnelly, there is a common theme that has been weaved throughout. She has consistently worked hard in one capacity or another to help others. You could say it’s in her DNA.

For Hélène, this compassion came from her family roots. “I came from parents who were role models, inspired to help others to have a better quality of life—it didn’t matter what the person did, and it didn’t matter the circumstance.”

A career in caring for others

That’s exactly the path she carved out in both her professional and personal life. Hélène was drawn to a career in healthcare and quickly began to leave her mark–right here at what is now The Ottawa Hospital. Her nursing career began at the then Ottawa General Hospital in 1959, where one week after graduating as an RN, she assumed the position of Assistant Director of Nursing. Only a few years later, her talents were recognized from across town and she became a director in nursing at the then Civic Hospital. She was a young woman, who chose to follow her career aspirations of caring for others, at a time when other women her age were getting married and having children. Hélène would be instrumental in leading that position for the next 27 years.

This strong, independent woman would go on to blaze a trail for healthcare. She’s recognized for developing and establishing, with the support of her committed staff, a list of major hospital programs. They include the Comprehensive Surgical Day Care, which was a first in Canada, Ottawa’s first Triage Nurse Program in the Emergency Department, the Cerebral Vascular Service and Poison Information Centre, also a first in Ottawa, and the city’s first Operating Room Technical Course. She is respected for completing a PhD (Education), without thesis, on a part-time basis during this hectic time.

Whether it was advancing care for patients or her life-long commitment to the education and wellness needs of women, Hélène has routinely been a voice and passionate advocate for others.

Giving back

Anytime she has seen a need, Hélène has acted. That included during her own personal health journey when diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007 at the age of 70. She was cared for at The Ottawa Hospital and while the treatment was excellent, Hélène saw an opportunity to improve the process for patients by consolidating care. “I’m pleased we have realized the vision of cancer leaders at The Ottawa Hospital with the opening the new Rose Ages Breast Health Centre. It will make a rough journey smoother for patients, families and caregivers,” says Hélène.

That dedication and commitment to giving back doesn’t go unnoticed. Dr. Jean Seely, head of Breast Imaging in the department of Medical Imaging at The Ottawa Hospital, says Hélène is a very generous donor and understands the need. “Hélène has donated effectively to sustain the goals of promoting clinical education and delivering high quality and patient-centered care at The Ottawa Hospital—the same approach she used during her successful career.” Dr. Seely adds, “She embodies The Ottawa Hospital mission to provide each patient with the world-class care, exceptional service and compassion we would want for our loved ones.” Dr. Seely feels fortunate to have collaborated with Hélène to help make this centre a reality.

Hélène’s actions and commitment to care at The Ottawa Hospital have long since continued into retirement as a volunteer and as a donor—she continues to find ways to give back. Hélène has been particularly interested in supporting women’s health through the Shirley E. Greenberg Women’s Health Centre and the Rose Ages Breast Health Centre, which has a room named after her.

A new journey

Hélène Létourneau-Donnelly and Philip Donnelly
Hélène Létourneau-Donnelly and her husband, Philip Donnelly, at their home.

Her retirement years have also presented her with new opportunities. In fact, it wasn’t until she was 68 that she fell in love with and married Philip Donnelly and became a wife for the first time. “He is a man who is the epitome of kindness and compassion,” smiles Hélène. With their marriage, Hélène welcomed two new important roles in life as a stepmother and step-grandmother. This new family immediately made her think more about the future and the legacy she wanted to leave for the next generation. It is of the utmost importance to Hélène that her stepchildren, step-grandchildren and the children of her friends have access to the world-class healthcare in Ottawa. “I would encourage people to think about the legacy they want to leave and how they can support future generations by leaving a gift in their will to support The Ottawa Hospital.”

With that, Hélène will continue to blaze a trail for future generations and inspire others to give back, just as she has.

 “I would encourage people to think about their legacy and how they can support future generations by leaving a gift in their will to support The Ottawa Hospital.”
– Hélène Létourneau-Donnelly

You, too, can have a legacy like Hélène by leaving a gift in your will to ensure your children and grandchildren have world-class healthcare when they need it.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.
COVID-19 at The Ottawa Hospital: a year of relentless care and research
A community that rallied to support our hospital, the race to find answers to a relentless virus, and the story of three nurses caring for COVID-19 patients during unprecedented times.

Decoding the mystery of Parkinson’s disease

For more than 200 years, no one has been able to solve the Parkinson puzzle. While the exact cause of the disease remains a mystery, dedicated researchers at The Ottawa Hospital are gaining ground—determined to solve the puzzle.

Dr. Michael Schlossmacher
Dr. Michael Schlossmacher in his lab at The Ottawa Hospital.

For more than 200 years, no one has been able to solve the Parkinson puzzle. Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer’s. It affects approximately 100,000 Canadians—8,000 here in Ottawa. The national number is expected to double by 2050. Each day, many of those patients face uncontrolled trembling in their hands and limbs, the inability to speak loudly, loss of sense of smell, and pains from stiffness.

While the exact cause of the disease remains a mystery, dedicated researchers at The Ottawa Hospital are gaining ground—determined to solve the puzzle. Ottawa is a recognized centre for neuroscience research. Dr. Michael Schlossmacher is the director of the Neuroscience program at The Ottawa Hospital and while he admits Parkinson’s is complicated and complex, there is hope.

“I strongly believe we can solve that riddle. We have the expertise to make a major contribution to a cure for this disease.” Dr. Michael Schlossmacher

Predicting the risk of Parkinson’s

For Schlossmacher, a step forward in unravelling the mystery of this disease came when he was struck by the idea of a mathematical equation, which could potentially foreshadow the disease before it develops. “I’m convinced that by entering known risk factors for Parkinson’s into this model, it is indeed possible to predict who will get the disease.”

Risk factors for Parkinson’s disease include:

  • age
  • chronic constipation
  • reduced sense of smell
  • family history
  • chronic inflammation such as hepatitis or types of inflammatory bowel disease,
  • environmental exposures
  • head injuries
  • gender, as Parkinson’s affect more men than women

Dr. Schlossmacher and his team of researchers are currently combing through data to test the accuracy of their theory to predict Parkinson’s.

To date, Dr. Schlossmacher and his team have analyzed more than 1,000 people, and the results are promising. “The surprising thing so far is the prediction formula is right in 88 to 91 percent of the cases to tell us who has Parkinson’s and who doesn’t—and this is without even examining the movements of a patient.”

The goal is now to expand to field testing in the next two years. According to Dr. Schlossmacher, should the results show the mathematical equation works, this could allow doctors to identify patients who have high scores. “We could modify some of the risk factors, and potentially delay or avoid developing Parkinson’s altogether.”

Partners Investing in Parkinson’s Research

Team PIPR RFR
Team PIPR co-captain Karin Fuller, left, with Elaine Goetz and fellow co-captain, Kristy Shortall-Cain.

Research is costly and community support is vital to help unleash new discoveries. In 2009, a group of investment advisors came together to create Partners Investing in Parkinson’s Research, more commonly known as PIPR. Each year, the group participates in Run for a Reason and raises money as a part of Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend. In 11 years, the group has raised $1.4 million for The Ottawa Hospital’s researchers and clinicians.

PIPR has not only helped to fund research toward better treatment and hopefully a cure for Parkinson’s, but the group has also brought much-needed attention to the disease. For Dr. Schlossmacher, funding for research from groups like PIPR, means more hope for the future. He is quick to add that PIPR has galvanized the momentum in our community because they see how committed The Ottawa Hospital is to making a difference.

“This investment by PIPR into research at The Ottawa Hospital has been a total game-changer for us. It has allowed us to pursue projects that otherwise would not yet be funded.”

Donor dollars translate into results

Dr. Sachs practicing the use of 3D technology
Dr. Adam Sachs practicing the use of 3D technology for neurosurgery.

PIPR’s support helped bring deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS) to The Ottawa Hospital. For someone like Karin Fuller, co-captain of team PIPR, she knows the positive impact this type of technology can have. “When my dad had that surgery he had to go to Toronto, which meant going back and forth for the appointments. It was a lot for him and for our family. Helping to bring DBS to our community is a tangible example of what we’ve been able to do as a group to support The Ottawa Hospital,” says Karin.

Also developed at The Ottawa Hospital is the world’s first 3D virtual reality system for neurosurgery. It is being used to increase the accuracy of DBS surgery for patients with Parkinson’s. Our neurosurgeons are the first in the world to use this technology in this way and the goal is to improve the outcome for patients.

Promise for the future

It’s also expected that one day 3D technology could be in every department throughout the hospital. The possibilities for this technology are endless and, in the future, it could help countless patients, beyond Parkinson’s disease.

When Dr. Schlossmacher looks at the puzzle of Parkinson’s, which he’s been investigating for 20 years, he sees promise.

“At The Ottawa Hospital, we think outside the box and that’s how we’re able to unravel mysteries through our research. Research which we hope will one day be transformational.”   Dr. Michael Schlossmacher

He also has sheer determination in his eyes. “To the chagrin of my wife, I will not retire until I put a dent into it. The good news is, I may have 20 years left in the tank but, ultimately, I’d like to put myself out of business.”

The Ottawa Hospital is a leading academic health, research and learning hospital proudly affiliated with the University of Ottawa.

We need your help to fund research into diseases like Parkinson’s at The Ottawa Hospital and to provide more hope for patients in the future.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
A meningioma tumour leaves mother facing blindness
In the fall of 2020, Michele Juma noticed the vision in her left eye was becoming cloudy. Fearing blindness, she travelled to The Ottawa Hospital where she received specialized care after learning she had a meningioma tumour – and time was not on her side to save her vision.
Staying on tempo: Cutting-edge surgery technique helps musician get back on her feet
When painful leg ulcers threatened Mina King’s mobility and ability to play the piano with ease, experts at The Ottawa Hospital came together in perfect unison with cutting-edge surgery techniques and compassionate care.

Undeniable gratitude from a young mom and her family

Eternally grateful for the care she received, Gina Mertikas-Lavictoire knew she wanted to give back to The Ottawa Hospital — she felt that she needed to.

Exceptional care makes young mother want to give back

When Gina Mertikas-Lavictoire received the good news that she had gone from breast cancer patient to cancer survivor, she knew she wasn’t done with The Ottawa Hospital.

Eternally grateful for the care she received, Gina knew she wanted to give back — she felt that she needed to.

“After my treatment was done, I asked my oncologist, Dr. Mark Clemons — who’s one of the best doctors in the world — ‘how can I give back?’ I need to do something to give back.” – Gina Mertikas-Lavictoire

Gina was 34 years old with three young children at home, the youngest just 12 months old, when she felt something was wrong — there was an unusual firmness in one of her breasts. A breast cancer diagnosis followed and rocked her family’s world. She immediately went into survival mode. “The first thing I asked my doctor was when can I have a mastectomy and when can I start my treatment. I never looked back,” Gina says.

Despite the alarming health news, she faced the disease with sheer determination. “I received excellent care at The Breast Health Centre at The Ottawa Hospital. I went through chemotherapy and radiation. I’ve had four surgeries including a hysterectomy and a double mastectomy.”

An unimaginable experience for a young mother, but the gratitude Gina has for The Ottawa Hospital is undeniable in her desire to give back.

Paying it forward

Gina Mertikas and Katerina Mertikas
Gina and her mother, Katerina Mertikas, a renowned local artist

“When I received the news that I would be able to watch my children grow up, that’s when I put the wheels in motion to help others,” recalls Gina. She came up with the idea of selling a calendar to support cancer research at The Ottawa Hospital.

Today, she’s feeling great and is solely focused on her fundraising efforts, which have exceeded her wildest expectations.

“From the get go, the calendars kept selling out. They were just flying off the shelves. What I’m surprised by is the amount of support that I had, not only friends and family but from all of Ottawa and across the country. People are supportive. We’ve even shipped calendars into the United States,” says Gina.

Gina hasn’t done any of this alone. Right alongside her during her diagnosis, treatment, and now the furious fundraising efforts is her family, including her mother Katerina Mertikas. Katerina is a local artist, who is renowned across the country for her beautiful paintings. It’s Katerina’s art, which is featured each month in the calendar.

Research is transforming care

For Katerina, it was extraordinarily difficult to watch her daughter go through the treatment and surgeries. “There are no words,” says Katerina.

However, the mother of two knows cancer research played a role in helping her youngest daughter recover. “My own daughter has benefitted from research through the treatment she received, which was Herceptin — a chemotherapy drug. It was originally used in a clinical trial before becoming a standard of care for patients,” acknowledges Katerina. It’s for that reason this mother-daughter duo is working together to help others facing the disease.

With calendars from 2019 and 2020 under her belt, and $25,000 raised for cancer research, Gina wants to see this continue for years to come with the help of her own children. Her eldest daughter, Katerina, has been introduced to philanthropy and what it means to give back. For Gina, she’d love to one day hand off the calendar project to the next generation. “I’m hoping someday my kids will take over this calendar and it will continue on,” says the proud mother.

Gina proudly displaying their fundraising calendar.

Excellence in care

For this family, there is undeniable gratitude toward the care team at The Ottawa Hospital, which helped Gina when her life depended on it. The impact has been profound on the family and for Katerina, especially from one doctor in particular — Dr. Mark Clemons, medical oncologist and associate scientist at The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre.

Dr. Clemons first joined The Ottawa Hospital in 2009 and has made a remarkable name for himself since, both among patients and colleagues alike. At the time, he was unsatisfied with the way breast cancer was being monitored and treated in Canada, so this quickly became his primary area of specialty for clinical trials.

In fact, in 2014, along with Dr. Dean Fergusson, Director of the Clinical Epidemiology Program, Dr. Clemons developed the Rethinking Clinical Trials or REaCT program as a way to make the process of enrolling in clinical trials easier and more efficient for cancer patients. As of June 2020, this groundbreaking program had enrolled over 2,600 patients, making it the largest pragmatic cancer trials program in Canada. In recognition of their success, the REaCT team recently earned a 2020 Research Excellence Team Award from The Ottawa Hospital. Dr. Clemons was also the recipient of the Chrétien Researcher of the Year Award in 2013.

For Gina, she is grateful to have been cared for by such an accomplished researcher who also happens to be a compassionate physician. Dr. Clemons offered guidance, encouragement and hope when she needed it most, and this inspired her to give back.

“Dr. Mark Clemons is a very special doctor,” says Katerina. “He made us feel so comfortable. He helped a lot with his attitude. He gave it his all — so how could we not give back? I wish we could give more.” – Gina Mertikas-Lavictoire

Listen to Pulse Podcast, and hear Gina’s story, including a special guest appearance by Dr. Mark Clemons.

Every grassroots fundraising campaign has impact. Create your own fundraising initiative today to ensure all patients, like Gina, have a chance to spend more time with their children.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
New approach to treating brain tumours changed young patient’s life
Following a decade of mini-seizures, Stefanie Scrivens was diagnosed with grade 2 oligodendroglioma. She would be one of the first to benefit from a new treatment option that could increase her chance of survival – and it’s working.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.

Tapping into the good feeling of giving back

COVID-19 is inspiring individuals, groups, and businesses to support The Ottawa Hospital and share their message of giving.

At a time when people are staying home to slow the spread of COVID-19, they are looking for ways to do some good in the midst of a global pandemic—to feel like they are lending a helping hand. For some, philanthropy makes them feel like they are being proactive, when almost everything else seems uncertain or out of their control.

Individuals, groups, and businesses are all stepping forward to help our front-line heroes. They are donating money, equipment, time, and food—after all, we’re in this together. Not only are they generously supporting The Ottawa Hospital, but they also hope to inspire others to experience that same good feeling of giving.

“Anything we can do to help our hospital, I want to be a part of it.” George Hanna, Gabriel Pizza

Gavin Murphy
Activist donor sends a message to the community
Phil Downey
Deep roots and always ready to give
Michelle Gleeson
Compassionate care for her father inspires her to give
Jason Zhang
Big impact from the Ottawa Chinese Community

“In times of emergency and stress, the number one priority is to help with those people who are on the frontlines in the midst of this crisis, and The Ottawa Hospital is number one.” – Phil Downey

George Hanna
Gabriel Pizza wants to be a part of giving back
Hélène Chevalier
My role and my responsibility to give
Ryan Carey
Tunes for TOH
Jason Cameron
Rallies his team at Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission in a unique way

“For whoever put a blanket on him when he was cold, for whoever gave him a sip of water, to whoever wheeled him to testing, that’s why I wanted to make a donation.” – Michelle Gleeson

The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened community awareness of the vital role played by front-line healthcare workers. For local donor Gavin Murphy, it’s never been more apparent. “I shudder to think where we would be without them today. The healthcare system has gone into uncharted territory as a result of COVID-19 and the need for support has never been greater.”

Gavin is a self-described activist donor. He led by example last year and donated $500,000 to The Ottawa Hospital. He will not waver from his commitment to maintain a publicly funded world-class healthcare system in our city. Gavin will not settle for anything less and he doesn’t think anyone else in our community should either. But that goal comes at a cost that cannot be borne entirely by government. His message is emphatic: Every little bit counts. “Even if you can only donate a few dollars and there’s a million people in Ottawa—that will make a tremendous difference. That’s the reality and that’s what we have to address. We cannot rely solely on the government, which has other validly competing interests to consider, in order to sustain our hospital.”

If he needs to be the messenger to encourage citizens to support The Ottawa Hospital then Gavin will gladly take on this role. “Continuing The Ottawa Hospital’s leadership role in publicly-funded healthcare and research is only possible when those who are in the position to donate actually make those donations be they small or great.”

Jason Zhang remembers watching the COVID-19 story unfold in China, the country where he was born. He and his friends acted to show their support immediately. When COVID-19 made its way to Ottawa, where he now calls home, he knew he had to act. “This is our hospital. This is our home,” says Jason.

Jason, a Founder and Editor-in-Chief of a Chinese community newspaper -Health Times -published in Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal, decided to bring together his network to raise $60,000 for the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund, which is used in part to purchase necessary equipment like ventilators and PPE. Never did Jason expect the outpouring of support he’s seen. “We’re already over $100,000!”

In fact, Jason and the Chinese community in Ottawa, including 43 associations, were astounded when they reached their initial goal after only four days of fundraising. They’re just thrilled to be able to give back and make sure The Ottawa Hospital has the right equipment required to care for patients during the pandemic.

When the final number was tallied, Jason and his friends doubled their initial goal, raising over $123,000.

These are difficult times for families, especially those who can’t connect with their elderly parents. That’s exactly what Michelle Gleeson faced. Her father lives in a nearby retirement home but she’s unable to visit because of COVID-19 restrictions. Instead, they talk by phone every day.

On April 2, Michelle received a call that her father, who is 91 years old and lives with Parkinson’s disease, had fallen ill and needed to go to the Emergency Department at the Civic Campus of The Ottawa Hospital. The news rocked her because she knew she couldn’t be by her father’s side. She soon learned he was in good hands.

“I spoke with the nurse, who put me right through to his doctor, Alena Spacek. The integration of everything at the hospital was phenomenal because they could see all of his previous medical visits. I couldn’t be there to explain everything but all his medical information was at the doctors fingertips,” explains Michelle.

Beyond that, while Michelle couldn’t see the compassionate care he was receiving, she could hear the level of care through the reassuring voice of Dr. Spacek. She called twice to speak with Michelle about her father, letting her know he would be okay, and when he could be released to go home.

She was so grateful and relieved, she needed to say thank you—and that’s when she decided to make a donation to The Ottawa Hospital. “For whoever put a blanket on him when he was cold, for whoever gave him a sip of water, to whoever wheeled him to testing, that’s why I wanted to make a donation,” says Michelle.

While Michelle couldn’t be at the hospital during this challenging time because of visitor restrictions, the care team left her knowing her father was in good hands. “When it all happened, I said a prayer that my dad would be in the hands of kind and caring staff. I cried waiting to hear news. Then, when I spoke to the nurse, I could hear the kindness through the phone. He was in the right spot and he was getting the right care. These are caring, loving people.”

Phil Downey’s family has deep ties to The Ottawa Hospital dating back to his mother, a registered nurse who trained at the Civic Hospital in the early ‘40s. A longtime, generous supporter of The Ottawa Hospital, Phil is always proud to give back—and especially now. “If you have a giving heart, it’s always there. In times of emergency and stress, the number one priority is to help with those people who are on the frontlines in the midst of this crisis, and The Ottawa Hospital is number one,” says Phil

Phil has made a generous commitment to raise $250,000 to The Ottawa Hospital’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund. He acknowledges these are difficult times for many families, but he believes there is a way for everyone to help our front-line workers.

“If you take a few minutes to think about a little thing you can do to help other people, it makes you feel so good inside. At the end of the day, a donation to The Ottawa Hospital not only helps the front-line workers and the team at the hospital, it really helps yourself because it gives you a little relief of the stress you’re under,” acknowledges Phil.

George Hanna’s wife, Malake Hanna, had three high-risk pregnancies dating back to 2004, and she received her care at The Ottawa Hospital. After that experience, George remembers going back to the office and telling his staff: “whatever we can do to help our hospital, I want to be a part of it.” That’s how Gabriel Pizza began giving back and saying thank you.

That generous support continues to this day, supporting the front-line workers during COVID-19. “It’s an honour and a pleasure to give back. No matter how many pizzas we send, no matter what we do—it’s not enough to thank them for what they’re enduring right now and what they’re dealing with,” says George.

The President and COO of Gabriel Pizza and his team have delivered pizzas to the COVID-19 Assessment Centre; they’ve made donations to the Emergency Departments at both the Civic and General campuses. It’s the Gabriel Pizza way of saying thank you. “The whole purpose is to send some pizzas to thank them and put some smiles on their faces. We’re all in this together and whatever we can do to help—sending pizza is just a small way of saying thanks,” says George.
After a brief pause, George reiterates, “Anything we can do to help our hospital, I want to be a part of it.”

Like many confined to their homes these days, there’s a feeling of frustration. That’s exactly what has gone through the mind of Hélène Chevalier, even though she realizes staying home is for the best.

However, Hélène concluded that she had her own role to play beyond just staying home. “I feel that it is my role and my responsibility to contribute to The Ottawa Hospital COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund, and in so doing, to be part of the solution,” says Hélène.

Hélène truly admires the work she sees and hears about from our hospital. “The employees of The Ottawa Hospital show care, dedication, and professionalism to save other people’s lives, and to find a long-term solution to this pandemic” says Hélène.

She goes on to say, “While doing so, they risk their own lives, they worry about their loved ones, and yet, they keep going. It is for them that I contribute to the Emergency Fund.”

Music has always been a part of Ryan Carey’s life—he loves strumming on his guitar. He’s been doing more of that these days, as he’s staying home like so many others.
Ryan works at The Ottawa Hospital in I.T. as a part of the Mobile Depot. Recently, he started posting videos on social media of some of the songs he’s been playing at home. The next thing he knew, he was planning a Facebook Live event. “It all came together quickly. I started getting requests for songs on social media. I would record and then post them. Then someone suggested a live show and that’s how this fundraiser took off.”

It was when he and his wife, Teri Wellon, a front-line healthcare worker in our community, were planning it out, that they realized there was an opportunity to raise money at the same time. “The Ottawa Hospital was of course the first place that popped into my head,” says Ryan.

On Saturday, April 25, Ryan went live with people tuning in from B.C. to Newfoundland and Labrador. With a large contingent of family and friends from his home province of Newfoundland tuning in, you could say it was a COVID-19 style kitchen party.

At the peak of the show, 140 people were watching Ryan play and he was watching the donations come in. “It just blew me away. I expected to raise a few dollars, but I never expected it to get as high as it did. I raised $1,105 and I donated $95 separately to make it an even $1,200,” says Ryan.

When he thinks about the amount he raised and supporting his fellow colleagues at The Ottawa Hospital, Ryan says it left him with a good feeling. “It feels very rewarding. It feels great to help the place where I work and where I see all the good happening.”

Working from home and being away from colleagues can be challenging for some, especially in light of a pandemic.

Jason Cameron, Vice President & Chief Communications Officer at Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, wanted to do something positive to rally and encourage his staff of 85 while also giving back to the community. In particular, he wanted to support The Ottawa Hospital’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund.

On May 8, he brought his team together via Zoom. It was no ordinary meeting. The majority of his colleagues, including Jason, decided to dress up as a favourite character. The screen was filled with costumes from Captain Hook to Winnie the Pooh, Harry Potter and everything in between. While the costumes were meant to add some levity, the team listened intently to Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng, ICU and palliative care doctor at The Ottawa Hospital share his stories from the frontlines.

“Amidst the anxieties and dangers of the pandemic, my team appreciated a virtual visit from The Ottawa Hospital. Their medical staff were motivated to be at work, innovating new COVID-19 therapies funded by the hospital and local community, and were so thankful for our commitment to stay home,” says Jason.

It was Dr. Kyeremanteng’s compelling story of care during COVID-19 that inspired them to give. “As public servants, we were honoured to raise some funds, and had some fun dressing in costume doing so, to help in the fight against COVID-19,” adds Jason.

The team raised over $1,735 — more than double their initial goal. Thanks to a match donation, their total turned into almost $3,500! It’s gifts like this which helped fund innovation care and research projects at The Ottawa Hospital.

Feel the good of giving by making a donation today to the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund.

More Inspiring Stories

 Light at the end of a dark tunnel: Overcoming peripartum depression
Peripartum depression left the future uncertain for Petra and her son.
Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
A meningioma tumour leaves mother facing blindness
In the fall of 2020, Michele Juma noticed the vision in her left eye was becoming cloudy. Fearing blindness, she travelled to The Ottawa Hospital where she received specialized care after learning she had a meningioma tumour – and time was not on her side to save her vision.

Nanji family donates $100,000 matching gift to help combat COVID-19

Their generous matching gift is directed to the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund and will support The Ottawa Hospital’s front-line and research efforts to fight back against the virus.

Times of crisis can bring out the best in people, motivating them to step forward and help turn things around for their community. As the COVID-19 crisis hit communities across the country, donors at all levels began to mobilize. The Nanji family decided they needed to act, donating a matching gift of $100,000 in support of the front-line efforts at The Ottawa Hospital to combat COVID-19.

Gulshan and Pyarli Nanji
Gulshan and Pyarli Nanji

The commitment of healthcare workers is what inspired them to give. “Everyone going to work in a hospital today is somebody’s loved one. There has been no other health crisis where we as Canadians have depended so much on the generosity and personal sacrifices of our healthcare workers,” says Mr. Nanji.

Their generous matching gift is directed to the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund and will support The Ottawa Hospital’s front-line and research efforts to fight back against the virus. By positioning the gift as a matching opportunity, they hope to inspire others to give whatever amount they can, even though these are challenging times for everyone. “No amount is too small…This crisis is teaching us how to be a community again,” says Mr. Nanji.

What’s unique about the Nanji family’s gift is that these long-time residents of Toronto made the decision early on to extend their impact beyond their immediate community. When they gave to The Ottawa Hospital they also gave to 16 other Canadian hospitals — a display of Canadian unity at its best.

 “As a family that has benefited so much from Canada over our lifetimes it was important to us to step up when Canada needed us,” says Mr. Nanji. “We have a history of giving to causes close to us, but COVID-19 affects all Canadians and as such, we wanted to do what we could to help all of Canada. My family and I are so proud to help where we can.”

For former hospital President and CEO, Dr. Jack Kitts, this gift is a reminder of the power of collective generosity. “The response from donors to the COVID-19 pandemic was immediate. We’ve heard from supporters, like the Nanjis, from across the country who want to be part of the solution and rally others to join with them. It’s been very inspiring,” says Dr. Kitts.

While The Ottawa Hospital is extremely grateful for this gift, the Nanji family expressed equal gratitude in return. “To the healthcare workers, we are indebted to you beyond words,” says Mrs. Nanji. “We are aware that you have your families to look after, yet you come and look after us and ours.”

To join the Nanji family in supporting The Ottawa Hospital’s efforts to combat COVID-19, and to take advantage of this matching opportunity, please consider a donation today.

Double your donation today, up to $250,000, and
support the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.
COVID-19 at The Ottawa Hospital: a year of relentless care and research
A community that rallied to support our hospital, the race to find answers to a relentless virus, and the story of three nurses caring for COVID-19 patients during unprecedented times.

Mierins family donates match gift to support COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund

Your donation to the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund will be doubled up to $250,000 thanks to a match gift from the Mierins Family Foundation. Your $100 donation becomes $200!

With the COVID-19 global pandemic forcing the healthcare system to adapt quickly, the Mierins family decided they needed to act.

Over the years, the Mierins Family Foundation has been a generous supporter of The Ottawa Hospital. Lisa Mierins says her family experienced firsthand the exceptional care of the hospital when both of her parents required hospitalization, including her father who was on life support twice in the last five years. “Both the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit teams were unbelievable. They took good care of all of us, and took us by the hand at a very difficult time.”

That admiration for the care their family received and a desire to improve experiences for all patients during the current pandemic made Lisa and her family want to step forward to create a match donation in support of The Ottawa Hospital’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund. “We have close ties to the hospital because of the way we were treated, like family. They’ve been amazing to us so we wanted to do something in return for them.”

“We realized we needed to do something — we needed to be proactive for our community.” – Lisa Mierins

Match donation

In return, the Mierins Family Foundation will donate up to $250,000 in a match donation to inspire others in the community to come together and give back. Lisa says their family came to this decision together. “We’ve been very blessed in our lives and this is our way to give back to the community at large. We feel this is the most important need right now.”

Arnie and Victoria Mierins

The Mierins Family Foundation was created two years ago. Lisa and her brother, Arnie Mierins, are co-presidents. The team also includes her sister-in-law, Victoria Mierins, and one of Lisa’s sons, Patrick Bourque. Philanthropy is a core value of the Mierins family with their strong desire to support their community.

The Mierins family hopes their match donation will rally and inspire others. They would love to see their family’s $250,000 transformed into a half a million dollars for the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund.

The fund was created to support urgent priorities to help patients and staff directly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic by:

 

    • helping researchers as they ramp up their work to contribute to the global fight against COVID-19

    • developing innovative treatments

    • supporting front-line medical teams

    • purchasing equipment and supplies

    • contributing to the care and comfort of patients

 

Like many, the Mierins family is deeply concerned about what’s going on in the world, and that’s why they stepped forward. “We just felt we needed to help the front-line workers. They are putting themselves out there, making a difference, and saving lives. We decided, as a family, that’s what we wanted to do. We wanted to help and encourage other people to help in any way they can.”

 “We have close ties to the hospital because of the way we were treated, like family. They’ve been amazing to us so we wanted to do something in return for them.” – Lisa Mierins

Double your gift today

Lisa adds it’s an opportunity for community members to double their donation and have a bigger impact—no matter what the size of gift. “It can be a $10 donation, which then becomes a $20 donation.” It’s about being able to have an impact at a time when the public is told to stay home, but healthcare workers are going to the frontlines each day—this is a way to give back and say thank you. “I just think about all the doctors and nurses who have given up so much of their time — their dedication is unbelievable,” says Lisa.

For the Mierins Family Foundation, Lisa says doing nothing wasn’t an option anymore. Everybody has a part to play. “We realized we needed to do something — we needed to be proactive for our community.”

Matching gift update

We are happy to report that the Nanji Family Foundation from Toronto have also been inspired to donate a matching gift to The Ottawa Hospital. Their generous offer to match every donation to the COVID-19 Emergency Response fund up to $100,000 will be coupled with the Mierins Family Foundation’s gift to bring the total available for matching to $350,000!

Thank you to the Nanji family for their leadership and for inspiring others to give and double their impact.

Double your donation today, up to $250,000, and support the COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.
COVID-19 at The Ottawa Hospital: a year of relentless care and research
A community that rallied to support our hospital, the race to find answers to a relentless virus, and the story of three nurses caring for COVID-19 patients during unprecedented times.

Local donor rallies community to raise awareness after prostate cancer diagnosis

A day doesn’t go by that Tom Clapp, co-chair of the Eastern Ontario Prostate Cancer Awareness Committee, doesn’t think about how he can raise awareness for prostate cancer. As a prostate cancer survivor himself, Tom knows firsthand the importance of regular checkups and testing – and is encouraging others to get on board.

Tom Clapp didn’t have any symptoms. He thought he was ‘perfectly healthy’. So, it came as a surprise when a routine prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test revealed that he had an aggressive form of prostate cancer. But a clinical trial at The Ottawa Hospital saved his life. Today, he’s inspiring the community to give back and is raising awareness along the way.

An unexpected diagnosis

When a routine PSA test, a blood test typically used to screen for prostate cancer, came back higher than normal, Tom Clapp and his wife, Janet Clapp, had their concerns. But neither was prepared for the news they would receive back in February of 2009. It was prostate cancer, it was aggressive, and due to its location, it was inoperable. Tom and Janet were gutted. How could this be happening?

“I thought I was perfectly healthy,” explained Tom. “I didn’t have any symptoms.”

Tom was referred to The Ottawa Hospital and recommended for a clinical trial. His treatment plan was in place; he underwent 42 rounds of radiation, followed by two years of hormone treatment to stop the production of testosterone which was feeding his cancer. His latest tests and scans show he is cancer free.

Hearing the words “you have cancer” is never easy. But from the day of Tom’s diagnosis, he was inspired to make a difference and have a positive impact on the lives of those in our community living with cancer. It was a conscious decision to take positive action during a time when he otherwise felt very little control over how cancer was affecting him.

“On the day he was diagnosed Tom said, ‘This is a gift. Now that I have this, I can talk about it with others’,” said Janet. Janet didn’t know it at the time, but Tom would go on to make a significant difference in the lives of countless individuals through raising both awareness and funds for prostate cancer research and care. His impact has been significant and it started with three of his closest friends.

Tom Clapp, prostate cancer survivor with friends

Tom (center) and his wife Janet (far left) with members of the
Eastern Ontario Prostate Cancer Awareness Committee.

After receiving his diagnosis, Tom encouraged three friends to get their first PSA test. When the results came in, all three of them were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Today they are all alive and well. Tom’s simple act of encouraging his friends to get tested could very well have saved their lives.

Raising awareness

This experience solidified Tom’s passion for raising awareness for prostate cancer and not a day goes by that he doesn’t think about it. Having been diagnosed when he was otherwise healthy, Tom knows firsthand the importance of regular checkups and testing.

“Too many men go untested, unaware that a simple blood test can lead to a diagnosis that might save their life,” explained Tom.

Tom pays tribute to his local family doctor, Dr. John Burke, for monitoring the results of his PSA test which raised concerns, resulting in a follow up at The Ottawa Hospital.

Tom’s own diagnosis, and his drive to raise awareness is what led him to play an instrumental role in developing what is known as the Eastern Ontario Prostate Cancer Awareness Committee (EOPCAC), as well as the Black Walnut Group, a support group for men who have been diagnosed, and their partners.

Strength in numbers

Once Tom received his diagnosis, he made a point to share his experience. He put his story in the local paper, organized a prostate cancer information session, spoke out at a community breakfast, and even went so far as to offer his phone number to those who were going through the same experience. If anyone needed someone to talk to, Tom wanted to be there for them. Over time, his phone started to ring more often. A great number of community members were opening up and sharing their experience with him. Tom recognized there was a real need and wanted to do more.

It was then that Tom suggested they start a support group. Everyone jumped on board. They planned their first meeting and in 2012 EOPCAC was born.

Getting out into the community

It wasn’t long before EOPCAC started raising awareness for prostate cancer in their community. “We have over 50 wellness days per year where we go out and raise awareness for prostate cancer,” said Tom. Over time, more people became aware of their group. Once the word got out, many were interested in not only joining, but also supporting it financially.

Dare to Flash a Stash

Simply getting out in to the community and raising awareness wasn’t enough for EOPCAC. They were determined to make a difference by giving back, too.

“Everyone in our group has had incredible treatment at The Ottawa Hospital,” said Tom. “We all have glowing reviews. So, we wanted to give back in some way. We decided to start a fundraiser.”

Wanting to support local prostate cancer care and research, EOPCAC organized a fundraiser they call Dare to Flash a Stash, in collaboration with the Winchester District Memorial Hospital Foundation. Members of EOPCAC decided to grow their moustaches to raise money and awareness for prostate cancer research and care.

It’s clear that they have their whole community supporting them along the way. “It feels like everywhere I go, when someone recognizes me, they hand me a generous gift in support of our fundraiser,” said Tom.

Even a local Cornwall brewery, Rurban Brewery, has pitched in by printing a moustache and ‘Dare to Flash a Stash’ on a can of beer to help raise awareness and funds. To date, this initiative has raised close to $185,000. Each year funds are distributed across various prostate cancer awareness, care and research initiatives, including The Ottawa Hospital.

There for each other

Seven years later, the committee is going strong. Members meet each month to support one another, as well as to brainstorm, strategize and plan how best to raise even more awareness and funds. As Tom thinks back to his life before his diagnosis, he exclaims, “Until I was diagnosed, I didn’t pay much attention. I didn’t think this would happen to me. It wasn’t on my radar. I don’t want others to make the same mistake that I did.”

Support The Ottawa Hospital today to help make a difference in the lives of cancer patients like Tom.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
New approach to treating brain tumours changed young patient’s life
Following a decade of mini-seizures, Stefanie Scrivens was diagnosed with grade 2 oligodendroglioma. She would be one of the first to benefit from a new treatment option that could increase her chance of survival – and it’s working.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.

Margaret's Gift

Ovarian cancer claimed Margaret Craig’s life. Now her generous gift is opening new doors to preventing the disease. Margaret knew research would ultimately provide the solution to ovarian cancer. Her donation through her will is opening new doors to preventing the disease that claimed her life.

In late 2019, an ovarian cancer study that took place at The Ottawa Hospital made headlines across Canada. It suggests that metformin, a medication commonly used to treat Type 2 diabetes, may hold promise for helping prevent ovarian cancer. This study was possible in part thanks to a retired Ottawa educator, Margaret Craig, who believed that research could beat the disease that would eventually take her life.

Margaret, who went by Peg to her family, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in Tucson, Arizona, just a few days before Christmas 2013.

She hadn’t been feeling well for a couple of months, but couldn’t quite pinpoint what was wrong, other than a failure to lose the couple of pounds she had gained, despite trying, and a slight swelling and firmness in her abdomen.

She decided to visit a walk-in-clinic after she had difficulty breathing. The clinic sent Margaret to an emergency department, where she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

The news left her reeling.

“Part of that was because I had to get back to Ottawa and it was Christmas,” she said in an interview in 2015. “But I got here. I caught a flight in a snowstorm on the busiest travel day of the year, December 22.”

Margaret immediately went to The Ottawa Hospital, where doctors confirmed the diagnosis. She began treatment in January.

“Peg would have been so happy with this result. It’s exactly the kind of cutting-edge research into ovarian cancer she would have wanted. It also gives me a sense of closure regarding Peg’s death.” — Holly Craig, Margaret’s sister

Margaret Craig

Margaret speaking at the Teas, Talks, and Tours symposium

Ovarian cancer hides in plain sight

“I have been told over and over again by the professionals that it is rare to detect ovarian cancer early,” said Margaret. “Mine was caught early enough that they could surgically remove everything that was over a centimeter.”

Margaret learned that there are often no obvious symptoms until the disease is advanced, and no reliable screening test to catch it early.

Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women, and among the deadliest, with a five-year survival rate of 45 percent. But researchers at The Ottawa Hospital, backed by the generosity of people like Margaret, are committed to changing these statistics for good.

Grateful for compassionate care

Margaret was so grateful for the compassionate treatment she received at The Ottawa Hospital that she was inspired to give back by investing in cancer research that could help people like her in the future.

She enlisted the help of her sister Holly Craig, a retired university professor and researcher living in Arizona. They spoke at length about Margaret’s desire to support innovative research in her will. Margaret asked Holly to find her a Canadian researcher who was doing groundbreaking work in ovarian cancer.

Holly identified Dr. Barbara Vanderhyden, a senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and the Corinne Boyer Chair in Ovarian Cancer Research at the University of Ottawa.

“It was clear that Dr. Vanderhyden was doing innovative research,” said Holly. “I liked her, and I liked her questions.”

Innovative research inspires gift in will

Holly flew to Ottawa to tour Dr. Vanderhyden’s lab with Margaret and learn more about her research. Margaret was particularly interested in Dr. Vanderhyden’s innovative and bold ideas. The visit convinced Margaret to make a gift in her will.

Dr. Vanderhyden sat with Margaret during her last chemotherapy treatment at The Ottawa Hospital, and was there when she rang the bell to mark the end of her treatment.

On June 2016, Dr. Vanderhyden invited Margaret to speak at an educational symposium called Teas, Talks and Tours she had organized for ovarian cancer patients and their families and friends.

“She was a private person, but she was willing to speak at Dr. Vanderhyden’s event,” said Holly. “That was a big step for her.”

Dr. Barbara Vanderhyden, The Ottawa Hospital
 Dr. Barbara Vanderhyden

At the symposium Margaret met Dr. Curtis McCloskey, a talented, capable young researcher on Dr. Vanderhyden’s research team who showed deep appreciation for her gift to research.

When Margaret reached her last few days, each day Dr. Vanderhyden would have one person on her team write a short story about the impact of Margaret’s donation on their work. Then Dr. Vanderhyden would send these daily stories to Margaret, so that she might be comforted by the legacy that she was leaving behind.

Margaret died from ovarian cancer in September of 2016, and Dr. Vanderhyden was asked to give the eulogy at her funeral.

Gift to cancer research bears fruit

Margaret’s generous gift has been put to good use. In 2019, Dr. McCloskey and Dr. Vanderhyden published a study that offers a new hypothesis about how ovarian cancer forms and suggests how it might be prevented.

The study is the first to show that the natural stiffening of the ovaries called fibrosis occurs with age. It also suggests that the diabetes drug metformin may be able to halt this process.

“We hope that someday metformin may prove to be an effective preventative treatment for younger women who are at high risk of ovarian cancer, but who can’t have their ovaries removed because they still want to have children,” said Dr. Vanderhyden. “We are so grateful to donors like Margaret who believe that research is the way forward.”

Holly and the rest of Margaret’s family are thrilled with the impact of Margaret’s gift.

“Peg would have been so happy with this result. It’s exactly the kind of cutting-edge research into ovarian cancer she would have wanted,” said Holly. “It also gives me a sense of closure regarding Peg’s death.”

Hospital staff with a banner thanking a patient

“The Ottawa Hospital is a leading academic health, research and learning hospital proudly affiliated with the University of Ottawa.”

We need your help today to help stop cancer in its tracks.

More Inspiring Stories

Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
New approach to treating brain tumours changed young patient’s life
Following a decade of mini-seizures, Stefanie Scrivens was diagnosed with grade 2 oligodendroglioma. She would be one of the first to benefit from a new treatment option that could increase her chance of survival – and it’s working.
After a multiple myeloma diagnosis, a husband and wife make plans to help future patients
After Dan Lynch received a shocking diagnosis of multiple myeloma, the Green Valley resident received a stem cell transplant at The Ottawa Hospital. Now, he and his wife Wendy have decided to leave a gift in their will to our hospital.

Young philanthropist couple pays it forward

Following the difficult birth of their second child, Shopify COO Harley Finkelstein and entrepreneur Lindsay Taub, saw a need and paid it forward.

Turning adversity into action – young philanthropist couple pays it forward 

It isn’t every day that people respond to difficult experiences by stepping forward to make a difference in the lives of others, but that’s exactly what local philanthropists and entrepreneurs Harley Finkelstein and Lindsay Taub did. And they hope their story will inspire others to do the same. 

Unexpected complications 

In February 2019, Lindsay was in labour with the couple’s second child. They headed to the Civic campus of The Ottawa Hospital with nervous excitement in anticipation of meeting their new baby. But the birth did not unfold as they had hoped. After a relatively easy labour and delivery with their first in 2016, they expected a similar experience. This time, labour was extremely difficult and tremendously painful. 

Lindsay required an emergency c-sectionThis is not what she and her husband, Harley, had planned for. They were scared at the prospect of surgery and for the well-being of their unborn child. Thankfully, their daughter was delivered safely, and both mom and baby were healthy.  

Lindsay and Harley were exhausted, overwhelmed by the unexpected series of events, and desperately needing a chance to decompress and rest  a challenge while sharing a room with three other patients and a constant stream of their nurses, doctors, and visitors.  

Discovering a need 

As the Chief Operating Officer of Shopify, a Canadian multinational e-commerce company located right here in Ottawa, Harley has dealt with his fair share of stressful situations but even he found this experience pushed his limits. “It was a stressful experience and we just hadn’t anticipated it,” said Harley. 

As healthy young parents, Harley and Lindsay have been fortunate to have limited interaction with the hospital. It wasn’t until this difficult experience that Harley realized what it was like to be the loved one of someone experiencing a health complication. The care Lindsay and their baby received was excellent, and he was confident they were in good hands. Yet, he saw a need for a space that would provide a better family experience following the birth of a child. Lindsay and I experienced a need and saw an opportunity to do something about it,” said Harley. 

“Everyone can do something that makes things better for someone else,” says Harley.
“I think this idea of paying it forward is what creates a vibrant, well-run, and prosperous community. And it doesn’t need to start when you’re 60 years old and retired- it should start as early as possible.” – Harley Finkelstein

Building community by paying it forward 

Harley and Lindsay both come from humble beginnings but reflect fondly on their respective childhoods and the emphasis that was placed on spending time together. This is what inspired Lindsay to open her own ice cream shop, called Sundae Schooland provide a place for families to gather together and enjoy a treat over conversation.  

As their respective businesses and careers grew, they felt strongly that along with their good fortune came a responsibility to pay it forward and help others. They have become well-known in the Ottawa area, not only for their entrepreneurial successes, but as influential philanthropists in a thriving community of people who believe in making life in Ottawa better, including contributing to the building of The Finkelstein Chabad Jewish Centre. 

“Philanthropy isn’t always about writing a big cheque,” says Harley. “It’s about finding someone who might be going through something difficult and making their life better. You don’t have to change everything but being incremental in donating your time or money can have a very big effect, especially if a lot of other people are inspired to do the same.” 

Mom and baby look into camera in kitchen
Baby Zoe at home with mom, Lindsay.

Turning their challenging circumstance into action  

And that’s exactly what Harley and Lindsay plan to do. With a donation to The Ottawa Hospital, they hope to inspire others to give back to their community in a way that is meaningful to them. 

“Supporting the hospital was very personal having given birth there and having received such excellent medical carebut also wanted to contribute to other aspects of people’s experiences. It was really important to us,” says Lindsay. “I want our girls to see that not only do we have businesses we care about, but we also care deeply about our community and want to contribute however we can – there are so many ways to do it.” 

“We care deeply about our community and want to contribute however we can – there are so many ways to do it.” – Lindsay Taub

A hope to inspire others 

Ultimately, Harley and Lindsay feel strongly that they need to lead by example, not only as role models for their own girls, but to motivate others in the community. 

“Everyone can do something that makes things better for someone else,” says Harley. “I think this idea of paying it forward is what creates vibrant, well-run, and prosperous community. And it doesn’t need to start when you’re 60 years old and retired- it should start as early as possible.”

Join Harley and Lindsay in paying it forward by
giving in support of The Ottawa Hospital today.

More Inspiring Stories

 Light at the end of a dark tunnel: Overcoming peripartum depression
Peripartum depression left the future uncertain for Petra and her son.
Inspiring gratitude
More than a year into a pandemic that has challenged our healthcare workers like never before, Dee Marcoux is once again hoping to inspire the community to join her in honouring healthcare workers. And she is doing it in a unique way.
A meningioma tumour leaves mother facing blindness
In the fall of 2020, Michele Juma noticed the vision in her left eye was becoming cloudy. Fearing blindness, she travelled to The Ottawa Hospital where she received specialized care after learning she had a meningioma tumour – and time was not on her side to save her vision.