The Ottawa Hospital’s response to mass casualty

In the face of trauma and tragedy, staff at The Ottawa Hospital work together to provide comprehensive, quality care to patients and their families.

Inside the trauma team and emergency departments response

Injuries and mass casualty incidents can strike at random. But while the timing and location of most incidents are unpredictable, The Ottawa Hospital’s response is not—the hospital is ready to provide the very best care to you and your loved ones should you one day find yourself as one of our trauma patients.

The hospital’s Emergency Department and Trauma Services involve a multidisciplinary team that work together to provide comprehensive, quality care to injured patients and their families. This team Includes trauma surgeons, anesthetists, physicians, registered nurses, respiratory therapists, social workers, physiotherapists, dieticians, speech-language pathologists, and occupational therapists. Each intricately working together to help our patients reach their full potential recovery after injury.

As the Regional Trauma Centre for eastern Ontario, the only level-one trauma centre in the region, The Ottawa Hospital plays an essential role in the development, evaluation, education, and ongoing quality improvement of adult trauma care.

“Our Code Orange plan means that, no matter what time of day a disaster happens, we’re always prepared to respond.” – Dr. Andrew Willmore, Medical Director, Emergency Management, The Ottawa Hospital.

Code Orange

Over the past few years, in collaboration with departments from across the hospital, the Emergency Management team, under the leadership of Joanne Read, Vice-President of Planning and Support Services, has revamped the Code Orange plan and has run regular training exercises to test it. “Our goal is to ensure that we can provide the highest level of care for our patients and community during a disaster,” said Read. “We want to live up to our vision of providing each patient with the care we would want for our own loved ones.”

A Code Orange could be called at the hospital in response to a wide variety of incidents in the community such as a disaster, an active shooter, or a transportation crash like 2019’s Westboro bus station crash.

Putting preparedness to the test

On a snowy November morning, the Civic Campus Emergency Department (ED) underwent an emergency response exercise. Those participating in the test were provided with a scenario: A shooting at a conference centre had left dozens injured and paramedics were en route with patients.

Within minutes, the hospital declared a Code Orange, signaling that it was responding to a mass casualty event. Staff leapt into action, as if a real Code Orange had been called, to prepare for patients and find the resources they would need over the coming hours.

While the bulk of the Code Orange exercise was centred on the resuscitation bay, important work happened elsewhere. A team triaged patients near the ED waiting room. Behind the scenes, command posts in the ED and the Operating Rooms (OR) directed resources to where they were needed and used the hospital’s real-time occupancy numbers to walk through how they would free up much-needed OR space and inpatient beds in a real scenario.

The Code Orange that morning was just an exercise – one of the largest the hospital has ever done. The training exercise was a success and provided staff with an important opportunity to learn so they can be even more prepared for the next time a real Code Orange is called. “Our Code Orange plan means that, no matter what time of day a disaster happens, we’re always prepared to respond,” said Dr. Willmore, Medical Director, Emergency Management, The Ottawa Hospital.

Westboro bus crash

Only a few months following the training exercise a bus crashed into the Westboro bus station.

Late in the afternoon of Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, staff at the Civic Campus ED started hearing word of a serious collision at nearby Westboro bus station. The hospital declared a Code Orange. This time, it wasn’t a test. Response teams from all over the hospital began converging on the ED within minutes. Disaster equipment carts were quickly deployed. Pharmacy and transfusion medicine staff took their posts. Eight trauma bays, equipped with a full trauma team, were formulated. Hospital staff were ready when the first trauma patients arrived.

Going through a Code Orange exercise prior to the Westboro bus station crash ensured that our staff were well prepared to manage a disaster of this magnitude. It’s for this reason that tests, exercises and mock events have become a routine procedure.


Military level preparedness

Trauma surgeon Dr. Jacinthe Lampron was one of the many staff members that took her post on that fateful day – Jan. 11, 2019.

As a reservist with the Canadian Armed Forces, who before working at The Ottawa Hospital, served in Kandahar’s military hospital as a trauma surgeon, Dr. Lampron is prepared to face any challenge head on.

She credits her experience in Kandahar’s military hospital for equipping her to manage the strenuous circumstances in the trauma unit. “Throughout my tours in Afghanistan working with the military, a mass casualty occurred on an almost weekly basis,” explained Dr. Lampron.

Techniques learned on the battlefield are often brought back and integrated into the care patients receive every day. And Dr. Lampron did just that when The Ottawa Hospital called a Code Orange on that cold January day. From her ability to organize eight trauma bays, to managing the treatment of each trauma patient that arrived in the two-hours following the bus crash, Dr. Lampron and the team were ready with military precision.

Doctor in scrubs standing in a hospital emergency room
Trauma surgeon Dr. Jacinthe Lampron

Lasting Impact

The effects of mass trauma events, such as the crash at Westboro bus station, have a significant impact on not only the patients and their families, but the trauma unit, the ED and the hospital as a whole.

An event of such magnitude touches many lives. For our patients, their arrival in the ED that afternoon was just the beginning of their road to recovery. Severely injured patients, like Marcie Stevens who lost both legs in the crash,  underwent multiple surgeries in the weeks following the incident, followed by lengthy rehabilitation. Their emotional healing lasting much longer.

Hundreds of staff continue to be affected, as we take our vision to treat all our patients like loved ones seriously and develop a strong connection with each of them during their hours of need.

“The lasting effect of this event on our hospital, the staff and each patient was significant,” said Dr. Lampron.

Marcie Stevens

Marcie Stevens was one of 13 severely injured patients who arrived at The Ottawa Hospital Trauma Centre after the Westboro bus crash. One year later, after losing both legs, Marcie continues her recovery at the Rehabilitation Centre and she’s grateful for the compassionate care she’s received.

One-year Anniversary

One year later, there is much to remember. Members of our community continue to persevere and heal.

“No matter how much you train for these events, it’s never the same as the real thing and there are always lessons to be learned,” explained Dr. Lampron. “We’ve never been more prepared then we are today to provide exceptional care to our patients.”

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Compassionate care awaited the Westboro bus crash patients
Marcie Stevens was one of 13 severely injured patients involved in the Westboro bus crash. One year later, after losing both legs, Marcie continues her recovery at the Rehabilitation Centre and she’s grateful for the compassionate care she’s received.
Trauma team saves arm
The timing to get patients with severe injuries to a trauma centre is critical. A new 60-minute paramedic-to-trauma centre initiative saved Adrian Molloy’s partially severed arm.
When Ashley Ruelland met her instant
In March 2015, Ashley Ruelland was driving to a bachelorette party in Mont Tremblant when another car crossed the centre line and hit her head on. After months in the Intensive Care Unit, trauma unit and rehab, her road to recovery continues to this day.

Compassionate care awaited the Westboro bus crash patients

Marcie Stevens was one of 13 severely injured patients who arrived at The Ottawa Hospital Trauma Centre after the Westboro bus crash. One year later, after losing both legs, Marcie continues her recovery at the Rehabilitation Centre and she’s grateful for the compassionate care she’s received.

It was a bitter cold, winter day on Friday, January 11, 2019. Marcie Stevens was making her way home to Kanata for the weekend from downtown. The Public Safety employee sat on the second level of a double-decker OC Transpo bus when it crashed into the overhang of the Westboro transit station. It was 3:50 p.m.

Ten minutes away from where the crash occurred, the trauma team at The Ottawa Hospital was alerted, and a Code Orange was called. The Emergency Department began clearing space, and a large number of staff converged including surgeons, nurses, anesthetists, emergency physicians, and support staff. A massive team of about 150 people would await the injured passengers. At 4:28 p.m., the first patient arrived at The Ottawa Hospital’s Civic Campus, home to the only level 1 trauma centre in eastern Ontario. In total, 13 severely injured patients over a two-hour period were rushed to the trauma centre – one of the injured was Marcie Stevens.

Calm amidst chaos

The married mother of two recalls being conscious and considerably calm throughout the entire ordeal. Though she was pinned on the top level of the bus and critically injured, she was able to call her husband, Christopher, to tell him she couldn’t pick up their children. She even thought to call work to let them know she wouldn’t be in on Monday and was able to help to calm those around her while emergency crews worked furiously to remove them from the wreckage. Marcie would need that calm composure in the midst of adversity for what awaited her.

“I couldn’t have gotten this far without the incredible people and support from The Ottawa Hospital – from the trauma team to the ICU to the Rehab Centre – it’s incredible. Compassionate is the best word to describe it.” – Marcie Stevens

The trauma team was ready

After arriving at the Emergency Department, Marcie recalls she had lost so much blood and that after her CT scan her blood pressure began to plummet, but the trauma team was ready. “The nurse in the Emergency Department had the O negative blood in her pocket. They immediately started pumping blood back into my system. My blood pressure stabilized, and I was then rolled into the operating room. The only time I passed out was when they put the mask on to put me to sleep.”

 

Four physicians in an emergency room at The Ottawa Hospital

(From left to right) Dr. Mahar Matar, Dr. Peter Glen, Dr. Ian Grant and Dr. Jacinthe Lampron

 

Marcie would wake up on Sunday morning, groggy and swollen. That’s when she learned from her husband that both of her legs had been amputated. “I knew going into the operation that my left leg was gone, because they told me. But they were going to try to save the right leg, but they couldn’t, and on Saturday they had to take it.”

While a completely new world awaited Marcie, her positive attitude never wavered. “You adapt and that’s what I have been doing. This is the way it goes. I couldn’t have gotten this far without the incredible people and support from The Ottawa Hospital – from the trauma team to the ICU to the rehab centre – it’s incredible. Compassionate is the best word to describe it.”

Waking up to a different life

Soon after the bus crash, Dr. Nancy Dudek, Medical Director, Amputee Program at The Ottawa Hospital Rehabilitation Centre, met Marcie at her bedside for the first time. “I had regular visits with Marcie when she was in the trauma unit to determine when she would be medically ready to come to the Rehab Centre.” The Ottawa Hospital Rehabilitation Centre specializes in the physical rehabilitation of those who have experienced a disabling physical illness or injury. It serves the residents of eastern Ontario.

Dr. Dudek is quick to point out though that Marcie’s rehab started soon after she was admitted to the hospital. “We started rehabilitation plans when she was still in the Trauma Unit. She was a very avid participant of early rehab.”

Marcie’s road to a new way of living life began with her multi-disciplinary care team helping to get her wounds healed. That would lead to teaching her how to move independently once again.

By the end of February, Marcie moved to The Ottawa Hospital’s Rehabilitation Centre. She says the staff were incredible from the moment she arrived. “I was in a room with three other women. They put the two who fell asleep early on one side and me and an older patient – the night owls – on the other.”

It was during rehabilitation that Marcie learned how to transfer from the bed to her wheelchair without a lift. She learned how to cook in a kitchen that is not accessible, to prepare for her return home, and she’s learning how to drive with hand controls.

Marcie Stevens and her family.

Preparing to go home

Dr. Dudek explains there’s a great deal to cover in rehab. “We teach wheelchair skills, including what the right wheelchair is for the patient. We also had to work on strengthening, including core strengthening. Then, we talked about what would be the immediate needs to get her home to her family, including her five and 12-year-old boys.”

Marcie went home on Friday, April 12, 2019. Three months after arriving at the hospital. When Marcie reflects on her feelings as she was leaving the rehab centre, she takes a moment and then replies, “It was a giddy day. It’s not like I didn’t like the Rehab Centre,” she quickly qualifies her response smiling at Dr. Dudek, “but it was good to be home with the kids.”

Of course, going home didn’t mean Marcie’s rehabilitation was over, but it was a major advancement in her recovery – a recovery that she faced head on with a resilience that never wavered. Dr. Dudek says it’s been inspiring to watch Marcie over the last year. “She is an incredibly positive person. That has been consistent. It’s something that was there right from our first meeting and it hasn’t really faded. She has a ton of energy and other people really gravitate towards her. She’s very popular around here.”

“Rehab is great. It is the jewel of the hospital that nobody knows about. They are sort of hidden away here. They have to deal with so many types of injuries and states of mind. Not everyone at the centre is accepting of what happened to them,” admits Marcie.

As Marcie recounts all that she’s been through in the past year, she still jokes and laughs. When Dr. Dudek is asked if she thinks this incredible attitude helped with Marcie’s recovery, the answer comes fast. “One hundred percent. She has made significant changes and implemented new things to her life. It’s very impressive to see. We can show people the way, but we can’t do it for them.”

Moving forward

Today, Marcie and her family are moving forward. A new home is necessary – one that is fully accessible, and Marcie talks about getting back to work someday.

Doctor doing strength training on a patient sitting on a table

Westboro bus crash double amputee, Marcie Stevens, doing strength testing with Dr. Nancy Dudek.

She misses her colleagues, but she knows that day will come with time. “I’m a very positive person and it will take time to get used to the changes in my life, to adjust to having no legs. It’s difficult. I’ll get there.”

For now, she will continue with her regular rehab. Eventually she will only need annual visits. For now, her weeks are filled with trips to the gym and the pool, all to get her stronger for the new world she faces. Despite the challenges, she embraces it all with confidence, a smile, and you could say a bit of attitude as she wheels away wearing her black leather jacket, sunglasses, and a streak of pink in her hair.

Your support will provide crucial funding
to improve the care of patients like Marcie.

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When Ashley Ruelland met her instant
In March 2015, Ashley Ruelland was driving to a bachelorette party in Mont Tremblant when another car crossed the centre line and hit her head on. After months in the Intensive Care Unit, trauma unit and rehab, her road to recovery continues to this day.

Trauma team saves arm

When the blade on Adrian Molloy’s power saw partially severed his arm, he was rushed to the Trauma Centre at The Ottawa Hospital. He was one of the first to benefit from a new quality improvement initiative that extended the time to 60 minutes for an ambulance to head directly to the Civic Campus, bypassing the nearest community hospital.

June 20, 2017, was a day like any other on the construction site, until the 14-inch diamond blade on Adrian Molloy’s power saw jammed in the concrete he was cutting and kicked back into his arm.

“It happened so quickly, I didn’t even know I was injured,” Adrian said.

The 40-year-old contractor had been using power saws on the job for 20 years. He was down in a hole cutting concrete when the saw kicked back. He was covered in dust so couldn’t see his arm, but knew he’d hit himself. He grabbed his right arm above the elbow, and his fingers landed on bone. Adrian knew it was a serious injury, and managed to get out of the hole and head to the road for help. His arm was bleeding badly.

Adrian Molloy
Contractor Adrian Molloy underwent two four-and-a-half-hour surgeries to repair his partially severed arm.

At the road, two Hydro One workers were sitting in their truck getting ready to leave. When they saw Adrian, the passenger called 911. The driver jumped out, and quickly took off his belt and tightened it around Adrian’s arm in a tourniquet. He was calm, and kept Adrian talking until the ambulance arrived.

In the ambulance, Adrian heard the paramedics talking with the dispatch.

“I knew they were looking to bypass Kemptville, but didn’t know what was going on,” said Adrian. “I knew my best hope was The Ottawa Hospital, so was happy they said we were heading to the Trauma Centre at the Civic. I was going somewhere where they could handle my injury.”

What Adrian didn’t realize was that he was one of the first patients to be part of a quality improvement initiative that the Ottawa Regional Trauma Program was testing in an effort to get patients to trauma care and provide more successful outcomes.

“Adrian was a direct recipient of our 60-minute bypass initiative,” said Mathieu LeBreton, Trauma Coordinator of the Ottawa Regional Trauma Program at The Ottawa Hospital. “Provincially, paramedics have rules that can permit them to bypass local hospitals to get to a lead trauma hospital if they are within 30 minutes of getting to a trauma centre. With the approval of all regional community hospitals, we expanded it to 60 minutes. Much of the literature suggests the sooner a patient receives definitive trauma care, the better.”

Where Adrian was injured was about a 45-minute ambulance drive to the Trauma Centre. Previously, he would’ve had to go to the nearest community hospital. LeBreton said trauma patients who need resuscitation from life-threatening injury need very resource-intensive care. They require more medical staff, access to operating rooms, imaging capabilities, more blood, and other resources that community hospitals do not have in their emergency departments. There is a team of health-care professionals at the Civic Campus specifically trained to deal with trauma situations.

When paramedics notify the Civic Campus Emergency Department that they are bringing in a patient with multiple or life-threatening injuries, a Code 1 Trauma is called over the hospital’s intercom. This alerts the trauma team, which includes trauma surgeons, emergency physicians, nurses, anaesthesiologists, respiratory therapists, and trauma coordinator Mathieu LeBreton, to prepare for the patient’s arrival. A Code 1 Trauma also notifies the blood lab, radiology department, and operating room staff that blood-work, X-Rays, CT scans, and surgery may be needed.

“Sometimes a trauma code comes in without advance notice, and then we’re reacting to it in the moment,” said Kelly Barnett, Clinical Manager of the Trauma Unit. “Everyone has a job, and it’s a code that runs smoothly to diagnose, triage, and save the patient.”

“I’d never been to a hospital injured like this before,” said Adrian. As he lay in the ambulance, his mind raced with concerns. “I asked, ‘Do they know I’m coming? Are they ready for me?’”

The answer was yes. The trauma team was ready and waiting for him when the ambulance arrived. When he was rushed through the emergency room doors, Adrian said he couldn’t believe, “You can get so many people in one room for one patient.” He was in the operating room within 47 minutes from the time he entered the emergency department.

“I knew my best hope was The Ottawa Hospital, so was happy they said we were heading to the Trauma Centre at the Civic. I was going somewhere where they could handle my injury.”

The power saw had cut 75 percent of his right bicep, two arteries and a nerve. In the operating room, surgeons reattached his arm. The four-and-a-half-hour surgery repaired arteries and his severed nerve. He underwent a second four-hour surgery to repair the damaged bicep with a donor muscle in November 2017.

The Ottawa Hospital’s Civic Campus is the adult lead trauma hospital for eastern Ontario. This takes in an area of 1.3 million people that includes Ottawa, stretches west to Pembroke and east to Hawkesbury. People with life-threatening injuries from Gatineau and western Quebec, as well as patients from Baffin Island and eastern Nunavut are brought to the Trauma Centre. Twenty percent of the population it serves lives in a rural area.

The Centre treated 856 trauma cases last year. One hundred and ninety-two of those patients benefited from the extended time guidelines from accident scene to trauma centre, with the average transfer time being 42 minutes.

Paramedics bringing stretcher into emergency

The eight-bed trauma unit is dedicated to patients who have multiple injuries. This could include head or brain trauma, limb loss, vascular, spinal cord, internal organs, multiple broken bones, broken spine, or neck injuries.

“Patients come into trauma from emerge [emergency department], and once they are stabilized, they then move through the hospital, as soon as possible, in order to get them back home, into rehab, or somewhere they can convalesce,” said Kelly.

Kelly said a patient’s length of stay in the trauma unit can be as short as 24 hours or as long as several months, depending on the severity of the injury and the ability to recover and heal. The health professionals in the Centre plan the patient’s follow up care or work closely with physiotherapy, and rehabilitation services to assess their need for rehabilitation.

“I know we often compare ourselves to similar standards from regional trauma perspectives: other hospitals we benchmark against in standardizing trauma care. We look to hospitals like St. Mikes [St. Michael’s Hospital] in Toronto to see their practices, and share ideas and common goals that we are trying to achieve,” said Kelly.

The Ottawa Hospital is part of the Trauma Association of Canada where members from across the country share vibrant practices about ways to improve patient care.

Hamilton and Kingston also have trauma centres, though The Ottawa Hospital is bigger because of the larger area patients come from.

The Ottawa Hospital has one of the largest trauma centres in the province, with Sunnybrook and St. Michael’s as the two largest. However, both Toronto hospitals cater to a dense urban population. The Ottawa Hospital covers a larger geographical area, so the timing to get patients to the trauma centre from a distance and the reason why the 60-minute bypass initiative is critical.

“What we found is there have been no negative outcomes yet. People like Adrian have benefitted directly from this,” Mathieu said.

Adrian Molloy with his wife Shelly
Adrian Molloy stands with his wife Shelly outside their home.

A year later, Adrian is back on the construction site with full use of his right arm and hand.

“I lost the motion for using a screw driver. I use it as an excuse to get out of work I don’t like. I use it to my advantage now,” laughed Adrian. “I’m doing everything I was doing before.”


The Centre treated 856 trauma cases in 2018. One hundred and ninety-two of those patients benefited from the extended time guidelines from accident scene to trauma centre.

More Great Stories

The Ottawa Hospital’s response to mass casualty
In the face of tragedy, staff at The Ottawa Hospital are well trained and prepared to respond. 
Compassionate care awaited the Westboro bus crash patients
Marcie Stevens was one of 13 severely injured patients involved in the Westboro bus crash. One year later, after losing both legs, Marcie continues her recovery at the Rehabilitation Centre and she’s grateful for the compassionate care she’s received.
Young philanthropist couple pays it forward
Young philanthropist couple isn’t waiting to pay it forward

When Ashley Ruelland met her instant

In March 2015, Ashley Ruelland was driving to a bachelorette party in Mont  Tremblant  when another car crossed the centre line and hit her head on. Her road to recovery included nine months  in  the  Intensive Care Unit, trauma unit  and rehab, and continues to this day.

Ashley Ruelland lying in hospital bed
Ashley, her mother Cheryl Ruelland-Jackson, Therapeutic Paws of Canada therapy cat Pecan, and her brother Robbie Ruelland.

Life can change in an instant. Ashley Ruelland lived to tell the story of her ‘instant’.

In early March 2015, then 27-year-old Ashley was living in an apartment with her two cats. She was busy working as a construction manager, part time as an office administrator, and she had started a catering business. She had never really been sick, and had no idea where the Civic Campus of The Ottawa Hospital was located.

That changed on Friday, March 13. Ashley was driving the bride-to-be and another friend to a bachelorette party in Mont Tremblant. It was a clear day and the three were brimming with excitement.

About an hour from their destination, on highway 323, a car crossed over the centre line, head on into their lane. That was Ashley’s instant. The noise from the impact was horrific, with the earth-shattering sound of grinding metal and fragmenting glass.

Miraculously, one of the first people on the scene was a resident from The Ottawa Hospital. She quickly assessed how serious Ashley’s injuries were. It took first responders over an hour to extricate Ashley from the car. She was rushed to the Hull Hospital, but because of the severity of her injuries, she was transferred to the region’s only trauma centre at The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus.

While her friends had relatively minor injuries, Ashley had a grocery list of broken bones: from her right big toe to her ribs and just about everything in between. Most significant were an open compound femur fracture, an open left elbow fracture, right humerus fracture, crushed and broken left and right foot and ankle fractures, an open book pelvis fracture, and multiple broken lumbar vertebrae.

“This lady’s life changed forever that day,” said Dr. Guy Hébert, Head of the Department of Emergency Medicine, when he looked at the hundreds of files related to Ashley’s surgeries and treatment.

She remained in an induced coma in the intensive care unit for two months. She endured numerous reconstructive surgeries, 100 hours of orthopaedic and internal surgery, and over 100 blood transfusions and infections.

“I was scared to think of the life that was waiting for me outside those hospital walls.”

 

Ashley walking in parrallel bars
A year and a half after her “instant”, Ashley was able to walk again with the help of a walker.

Four months after the crash, Ashley began physiotherapy in her hospital bed and could finally eat solid food.

She had lost all of her hair and had severe nerve damage, chronic illness myopathy and neuropathy.

“I couldn’t feed myself, brush my own teeth or move much at all. The first couple of weeks seemed like torture. The nurses would set little goals, like sitting up in my wheelchair for 20 minutes a day. The physiotherapist and occupational therapist didn’t know if I’d ever walk again. I was scared to think of the life that was waiting for me outside those hospital walls,” said Ashley.

But then her first real sign of recovery came a few weeks later when she was able to feed herself.

In August, Ashley moved to the rehabilitation centre at the General Campus where she began an intensive regime of physical, occupational and psychological therapy programs. Just before Christmas, nine months after the accident, Ashley left the hospital. Although she was in a wheelchair and hadn’t made many functional gains, Ashley felt stronger and healthier.

The young woman continued as an outpatient with rehab, and had her last surgery in February 2016, which allowed her to transfer from her bed to chair, independently.

“In May 2016, I stood independently for the first time,” she said. “And after many more weeks of painful standing and walking in the hospital’s therapy pool, I started to walk with the aid of a harness within the parallel bars. By the end of the summer, I was able to move with a walker.”

Over two years later, Ashley is walking again. In fact, not only is she walking but she’s travelling, recently returning from Ireland. She’s also in school and looking to buy a home.


Ashley reflects on her  life-altering ‘instant’  and is eternally grateful for the exceptional  care  she received  at The Ottawa Hospital.  “Without it, I wouldn’t be here today.”

More Great Stories

The Ottawa Hospital’s response to mass casualty
In the face of tragedy, staff at The Ottawa Hospital are well trained and prepared to respond. 
Compassionate care awaited the Westboro bus crash patients
Marcie Stevens was one of 13 severely injured patients involved in the Westboro bus crash. One year later, after losing both legs, Marcie continues her recovery at the Rehabilitation Centre and she’s grateful for the compassionate care she’s received.
Young philanthropist couple pays it forward
Young philanthropist couple isn’t waiting to pay it forward

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